STP 164a Sicklingen

STP 164a Sicklingen located in Waringzelle, Northern France.

Address:

Waringzelle region
Pas-de-Calais
France

Not accessible to the public

There are two M270 bunker remains as well as the remains of a radar installation at this site. This was an important part of the defense of the Cap Gris-Nez area and observation of ship traffic in the English channel after 1940.

This location is not accessible to the public and is on private farm land as are most of the bunker remains in this area. However I was able to locate the farmer as he was pulling away on his tractor and got permission to take some nice photographs. There were some areas of this site that I was not able to get to as the dairy cows were in pasture and as you will see in some of my photographs they were standing right where I wanted to be, we will try and re-visit this location on another trip perhaps.

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Some nice dairy cows inhabit the area which prevented further examination of the V143 Mammutgerat Radar Installation.
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All photographs on this visit were taken on July 13th, 2016 and are subject to copyright. Please be respectful and do not copy them for your own personal or professional use. If you would like to contact the photographer and admin of this web site please e-mail admin@germanbunkers.com

I used two different cameras on the 2016 visit. The Nikon Coolpix 35mm and the Apple iPhone Six S Plus.

The 1st of 2 M270 bunkers on this site.

Such a beauty to behold, the nose of one of two M270 type bunkers.

I affectionately call these two "the twins". Brothers watching out to sea 70 plus year on.

The unique leveling of the cement on the nose of the M270 is a classic architectural part of the Atlantik Wall.

The back end of the M270. This would lead to the Tobruk where a machine gun nest would be in place. Now covered in some farming debris.

The other side of the bunker has the opening for the Tobruk and was accessible.

The back door to the Tobruk.

Once inside I found a spent shell lying on the cement floor. I doubt it was German and probably from the farmers shotgun, I left it where it was.

A really nice shot looking up through the tobruk. You can barley make out the steel swivel ring where the gun would would rotate .

The rear of the radar site that stood here. These played a critical role in the defense of this sector.

The radar site sat on top of these cement blocks. Note the steel rungs for service.

A distant shot of the radar emplacement and the M270 to the right. This pasture is now home to dairy cows.

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